violence

January 9, 2019

Hispanic and black populations have a higher risk of becoming victims of race- or ethnicity- motivated violent hate crimes compared with non-Hispanic whites, according to a new study from the University of Washington.

Karen Fredriksen-Goldsen, a professor at the University of Washington School of Social Work, was principal investigator of the first U.S. longitudinal study of health and well-being of LGBTQ midlife and older adults.

Joining a gang in adolescence has significant social consequences in adulthood beyond criminal behavior, even after a person leaves the gang.

Men who used a weapon against their female partners were more likely to commit a follow-up act of violence, according to a new study from the University of Washington School of Public Health and collaborating institutions. A weapon was defined a

All parents want what’s best for their children.

If your primary care physician asked whether there’s a gun in your home, how would you feel? Astounded? Spitting mad? Freshly aware of the potential risk? Unsure?
 

June 8, 2017

Karen Fredriksen-Goldsen, a professor at the University of Washington School of Social Work, was principal investigator of the first U.S. longitudinal study of health and well-being of LGBTQ midlife and older adults.

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