smoke

Doctor checking on pediatric patient
September 14, 2020

While the most apparent symptoms of wildfire smoke are coughing, shortness of breath, sore throats, and red eyes, your ears can also become irritated.

September 15, 2020

“It’s all the same system,” said Dr. Albert Merati, a UW Medicine otolaryngologist.  “Things that irritate your nose or throat would also irritate your ears.”

Smoky view of the Space Needle
September 8, 2020

Powerful winds have spread smoke from wildfires in Eastern Washington across the the state. Take care of your lungs by reducing your exposure to this unhealthy air. 

Sun shrouded by smoke
September 3, 2019

The haze of wildfire smoke in the skies has become a common sight in late summer.  Dr. Coralynn Sack, a UW Medicine pulmonologist, says her patients complain of worsened symptoms when smoke is in the air. 

picture of smoky sky in Seattle, caused by recent fires
September 5, 2017

(Downloadable video soundbites and b-roll) The smoke-filled air that has enveloped Seattle for several days makes breathing especially difficult for people with asthma and other lung conditions, says UW Medicine pulmonologist Joshua Benditt.

August 7, 2017

Usually, clear blue skies mark the end of summer in the Northwest. But not this year.

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