Institute for Protein Design

September 27, 2017

Scientists have created a way to generate thousands of different mini-protein binders as possible drug candidates.  

When a protein folds correctly, it spurs a biological process in a cell -- one of many that enable the human body to live. Our bodies have about 100,000 distinct proteins, built from strings of amino acids, and each protein has a job to do.

Traces of protein changes that have occurred over millions of years of evolution have allowed scientists to quickly decipher the 3-D shape of hundreds of proteins.  Previously, these structures had remained a long-standing puzzle.

Scientists at the University of Washington in Seattle have deciphered key rules that govern how proteins form pocket-like structures essential to many protein functions.

Note to news editors and broadcasters: Still images, b-roll, background materials, and  a video news package are available on request.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Media contact:  

Leila Gray, 206.685.0381, leilag@uw.edu

Scientists at the University of Washington’s Institute for Protein Design have shown it is possible to create small, hyperstable peptides that could provide the basis for developing powerful new drugs and diagnostic tests. 

Gamers playing the popular online puzzle game Foldit triumphed over scientists, college students and computer algorithms in a contest to identify a particular protein molecule’s shape. 

GeekWire reports the news that biochemists at th

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