athletes

André Kajlich has the perfect race mapped out in his head: Start at the lowest and end at the highest point on all seven continents. Traverse the distance between both points by swimming, climbing and biking.
 

National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) athletes have a significantly higher incidence of sudden cardiac death than previously thought, especially among men, African Americans, and male basketball players, according to a study published

Washington state's student athletes gained a measure of safety today as Gov.

Top sports-cardiology and -medicine physicians are meeting this weekend in Seattle to discuss efforts to improve cardiac safety in athletes.

It’s late in the season and late in the game – a time when every yard gained takes on more meaning as players extend beyond their physical limits.

The Geivett family discusses how they live with the dangers of concussion as both their children play team sports that involve high physical contact.

Sudden cardiac arrest is the leading cause of death among athletes, but the incidence of such deaths has only been estimated, to date, because reporting has not been mandatory.

The number of concussions reported by coaches in Seattle public high schools has more than doubled since the Zackery Lystedt Law came into effect in 2009, University of Washington researchers report.

Current health-screening recommendations for student athletes comprise an oral history and physical exam, but these indicators are not as effective as an electrocardiogram (ECG) at detecting students at higher risk for sudden cardiac arrest, sug

Concussions are common among middle-school girls who play soccer, and most continue to play with symptoms, according to a study by John W. O’ Kane, M.D., of the University of Washington Sports Medicine Clinic, Seattle, and colleagues.

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