Could $5-per-person stake prevent 147 million deaths?

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Could $5-per-person stake prevent 147 million deaths?

Researchers make case for global investment in women’s and children’s health
Jeff Hodson

Increasing health expenditures by $5 per person per year over the next two decades in 74 countries could yield up to nine times that value in economic and social benefits, according to a recent study in The Lancet. The returns include greater gross domestic product growth through improved productivity, and could prevent the deaths of 147 million children and 5 million women, the study’s authors say.


Dean Jamison and Carol Levin
Dean Jamison and Carol Levin were among the researchers contributing to the report.
Dean Jamison and Carol Levin

UW School of Public Health’s Dr. Dean Jamison, professor emeritus of global health, and Dr. Carol Levin, clinical associate professor of global health, were among the report’s co-authors. Despite substantial progress over the last two decades, they write, there are still unacceptably high rates of preventable maternal and child deaths, particularly in south Asia and sub-Saharan Africa.
 
The researchers based their projections on an additional investment of $30 billion per year in the 74 countries, or about 2 percent above current spending levels, through the year 2035. Increased investment is needed in health systems and in high-impact interventions for maternal and newborn health, child health, immunization, family planning, HIV/ AIDS, and malaria. Expanding access to contraception would be a particularly cost-effective investment, the study notes.
 
Link to The Lancet abstract