The science behind 'circadian' lights

February 20, 2020

The science behind 'circadian' lights

Researchers said the wavelengths at sunrise and sunset have the biggest impact to brain centers that regulate our circadian clock and our mood and alertness. Their study was published Feb. 20 in Current Biology. 

The University of Washington has licensed technology based on this discovery to a lighting manufacturer that will sell white LED bulbs that incorporate undetectable sunrise and sunset wavelengths. See related story for details.

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UW Medicine
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